When parents in Pensacola divorce, it is likely that the noncustodial parent will be ordered to pay child support to the custodial parent. Child support is necessary to ensure the child has the resources needed to grow and thrive. However, paying child support is not always easy and in some cases a parent might purposely avoid paying child support.

Consequences for failing to pay child support

Under Florida law there are consequences for failing to pay child support. The following are some examples of what may happen if you fail to pay child support.

  • Income withholding: if you fail to pay child support, a notice may be sent to your employer ordering that child support payments be deducted from your paycheck.
  • Suspension Actions: if you fail to pay child support, you could face the suspension of your driver’s license, a professional license and/or a recreational license such as a fishing or hunting license.
  • Liens: if you fail to pay child support, the court may put a lien on your automobile or boat.
  • Collections of other sources of income: if you fail to pay child support, any insurance settlements, income tax refunds, or workers’ compensation benefits could be intercepted.
  • Bank accounts: if you fail to pay child support, any amounts owed may be taken from any checking or savings accounts you have in your name.
  • Credit reporting: if you fail to pay child support, delinquent payments may be reported to credit agencies. This could affect your credit score, making securing a home or loan difficult.

There may be other consequences for failing to pay child support

The above consequences are those that can be enforced by the Florida Child Support Program. There may be other consequences not listed here that a court could take in delinquent child support cases. It is important then, not to avoid paying what you owe in child support, or if you cannot afford your child support payments, to pursue a modification of child support as soon as possible.